On the News | Mollusk Graveyards are time machines to oceans’ pristine past @ Florida Museum


On the News@ Florida Museum


Title: 

Mollusk Graveyards are time machines to oceans’ pristine past


Excerpt:

“A Florida Museum of Natural History study shows that mollusk fossils provide a reliable measure of human-driven changes in marine ecosystems and shifts in ocean biodiversity.

Shells left behind by dead mollusks provide a glimpse into how marine ecosystems looked before human activities altered them. Photo courtesy of Carrie Tyler (@source)

Collecting data from the shells of dead mollusks is a low-impact way of glimpsing how oceans looked before pollution, habitat loss, acidification and explosive algae growth threatened marine life worldwide. Mollusk fossils can inform current and future conservation and restoration efforts, said Michal Kowalewski, the Jon L. and Beverly A. Thompson Chair of Invertebrate Paleontology and the study’s principal investigator.

“You can think of these fossils as marine time machines that can unveil bygone habitats that existed before humans altered them,” he said. “Shells can help us understand past marine life and more precisely gauge recent changes in marine ecosystems. Fossils are the only direct way of learning what these ecosystems looked like before human activities disturbed them.”” (…) READ MORE

Lurdes Fonseca

Assistant Professor and Researcher at University of Lisbon
Sociologist (PhD), Paleontologist (Researcher in Micropaleontology), Majors in Sociology and Biology, Minor in Geology. Main interests in Paleontology: Microfossils, Molecular fossils, Paleobiology and Paleoecology. (read more about me)
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE  Just out | Palaxius salataensis Brönnimann, Cros and Zaninetti, 1972, the oldest crustacean microcoprolite from the early Carboniferous of Guangxi, South China @ PalZ