Antarctic

Just out | Rich shallow-water benthic ecosystem in Late Miocene East Antarctica (Fisher Bench Fm, Prince Charles Mountains) @ Marine Micropaleontology

Just out @ Marine Micropaleontology Rich shallow-water benthic ecosystem in Late Miocene East Antarctica (Fisher Bench Fm, Prince Charles Mountains) Author(s) Wojciech Majewski, Andrzej Tatur, Jakub Witkowski, Andrzej Gaździcki Abstract: A single shell of a pectenoid bivalve was found in the lower part of the Fisher Bench Formation (Fisher Massif, Prince Charles Mountains). In contrast to glacigenic sediments that form extensive outcrops in this area and are almost barren of foraminifera, small pieces of

Just out | Conifer fossil woods from the Santa Marta Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Brandy Bay, James Ross Island, Antarctica @ Cretaceous Research

Just out @ Cretaceous Research Conifer fossil woods from the Santa Marta Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Brandy Bay, James Ross Island, Antarctica Author(s) R.R. Pujana, M.E. Raffi, E.B. Olivero Abstract: Conifer fossil woods from the Santonian to lower Campanian Santa Marta Formation are anatomically studied in detail. The wood flora is dominated by conifers, mainly Araucariaceae. Conifer fossil woods represent 84% of the samples (26 of 31) of the assemblage. The remaining

Just out | A new quantitative approach to identify reworking in Eocene to Miocene pollen records from offshore Antarctica using red fluorescence and digital imaging @ Biogeosciences

Just out @ Biogeosciences A new quantitative approach to identify reworking in Eocene to Miocene pollen records from offshore Antarctica using red fluorescence and digital imaging Author(s) Stephanie L. Strother, Ulrich Salzmann, Francesca Sangiorgi, Peter K. Bijl, Jörg Pross, Carlota Escutia, Ariadna Salabarnada, Matthew J. Pound, Jochen Voss, and John Woodward Abstract: Antarctic palaeoclimate evolution and vegetation history after the formation of a continent-scale cryosphere at the Eocene–Oligocene boundary, 33.9

On the News | Antarctica was once green @Nerve.in

On the News @ Nerve.in Title:  Antarctica was once green Excerpt: “Nearly 300 million years ago, the frozen, inhospitable Antarctica was covered by lush subtropical forests, according to scientists. That Antarctica was once green is a matter of consensus among scientists, but still unknown to many people, Marcelo Leppe, a paleontologist who works with the Chilean Antarctic National Institute, told Efe news on Friday. Leppe, Chile’s representative to the international

Just out | Microbial formation of labile organic carbon in Antarctic glacial environments @ Nature Geoscience

Just out @ Nature Geoscience Microbial formation of labile organic carbon in Antarctic glacial environments Author(s) H. J. Smith, R. A. Foster, D. M. McKnight, J. T. Lisle, S. Littmann, M. M. M. Kuypers & C. M. Foreman Abstract: Roughly six petagrams of organic carbon are stored within ice worldwide. This organic carbon is thought to be of old age and highly bioavailable. Along with storage of ancient and new

Just out | Onshore–offshore trends in Campanian ammonite facies from the Marambio Group, Antarctica: Implications for ammonite habitats @ Cretaceous Research

Just out @ Cretaceous Research Title:  Onshore–offshore trends in Campanian ammonite facies from the Marambio Group, Antarctica: Implications for ammonite habitats Author(s) Eduardo B. Olivero, María Eugenia Raffi Abstract: Recent biostratigraphic and sedimentologic studies in the lower–mid Campanian ammonite-rich shelf deposits of the James Ross Basin, Antarctica made possible a precise reconstruction of facies tracts along an onshore–offshore transect about 70 km in length. In proximal, inner-shelf settings the Santa Marta Formation