Quaternary

Just out | Trophic interactions between larger crocodylians and giant tortoises on Aldabra Atoll, Western Indian Ocean, during the Late Pleistocene @ Royal Society Open Science

Just out @ Royal Society Open Science Trophic interactions between larger crocodylians and giant tortoises on Aldabra Atoll, Western Indian Ocean, during the Late Pleistocene Author(s) Torsten M. Scheyer, Massimo Delfino, Nicole Klein, Nancy Bunbury, Frauke Fleischer-Dogley, Dennis M. Hansen Abstract: Today, the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Aldabra Atoll is home to about 100 000 giant tortoises, Aldabrachelys gigantea, whose fossil record goes back to the Late Pleistocene. New Late Pleistocene fossils (age ca. 90–125 000 years) from

Just out | Pollen record of early- to mid-Holocene vegetation and climate dynamics on the eastern coast of the Yellow Sea, South Korea @ The Holocene

Just out @ The Holocene Pollen record of early- to mid-Holocene vegetation and climate dynamics on the eastern coast of the Yellow Sea, South Korea Author(s) Bing Song , Sangheon Yi, Wook-Hyun NahmWook-Hyun Nahm, Jin-Young Lee, Limi Mao, Longbin Sha, Zhongyong Yang, Jinpeng Zhang Abstract: To understand the early- to mid-Holocene vegetation and climate dynamics on the eastern coast of the Yellow Sea, we obtained a sedimentary core with high-resolution accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) carbon 14 (14C)

Just out | A southern African origin and cryptic structure in the highly mobile plains zebra @ Nature Ecology & Evolution

Just out @ Nature Ecology & Evolution A southern African origin and cryptic structure in the highly mobile plains zebra Author(s) Casper-Emil T. Pedersen, Anders Albrechtsen, Paul D. Etter, Eric A. Johnson, Ludovic Orlando, Lounes Chikhi, Hans R. Siegismund & Rasmus Heller Abstract: The plains zebra (Equus quagga) is an ecologically important species of the African savannah. It is also one of the most numerous and widely distributed ungulates, and six subspecies have been described based on morphological

Just out | Evidence for stratigraphy in molluscan death assemblages preserved in seagrass beds: St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands @ Paleobiology

Just out @ Paleobiology Evidence for stratigraphy in molluscan death assemblages preserved in seagrass beds: St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands Author(s) Kelsey M. Arkle, Arnold I. Miller Abstract: Death assemblages that occupy the upper tens of centimeters of sediment in shallow-marine settings are often subject to extensive mixing, thereby limiting their usefulness in assessing environmentally mediated compositional changes through time in the local biota. Here, we provide evidence that dense, Thalassia-rich seagrass beds

Just out | Lizards of the lost arcs: mid-Cenozoic diversification, persistence and ecological marginalization in the West Pacific @ Proceedings of the Royal Society B

Just out @ Proceedings of the Royal Society B Lizards of the lost arcs: mid-Cenozoic diversification, persistence and ecological marginalization in the West Pacific Author(s) Paul M. Oliver, Rafe M. Brown, Fred Kraus, Eric Rittmeyer, Scott L. Travers, Cameron D. Siler Abstract: Regions with complex geological histories often have diverse and highly endemic biotas, yet inferring the ecological and historical processes shaping this relationship remains challenging. Here, in the context of the taxon cycle model

Just out | Near-surface permafrost aggradation in Northern Hemisphere peatlands shows regional and global trends during the past 6000 years @ The Holocene

Just out @ The Holocene Near-surface permafrost aggradation in Northern Hemisphere peatlands shows regional and global trends during the past 6000 years Author(s) Claire C Treat, Miriam C Jones Abstract: The history of permafrost aggradation and thaw in northern peatlands can serve as an indicator of regional climatic history in regions where records are sparse. We infer regional trends in the timing of permafrost aggradation and thaw in North American and

Just out | Punctuated changes in the morphology of an endemic diatom from Lake Titicaca @ Paleobiology

Just out @ Paleobiology Punctuated changes in the morphology of an endemic diatom from Lake Titicaca Author(s) Trisha L. Spanbauer, Sherilyn C. Fritz, Paul A. Baker Abstract: High levels of biodiversity and endemism in ancient lakes have motivated research on evolutionary processes in these systems. Drill-core records from Lake Titicaca (Bolivia, Peru), an ancient lake in the high-elevation Altiplano, record the history of climate, landscape dynamics, and diatom evolution. That record

Just out | Paleoecological evidence for decadal increase in phytoplankton biomass off northwestern Australia in response to climate change @ Ecology and Evolution

Just out @ Ecology and Evolution Paleoecological evidence for decadal increase in phytoplankton biomass off northwestern Australia in response to climate change Author(s) Zineng Yuan, Dongyan Liu, John K. Keesing, Meixun Zhao, Shixin Guo, Yajun Peng, Hailong Zhang Abstract: Ocean warming can modify the phytoplankton biomass on decadal scales. Significant increases in sea surface temperature (SST) and rainfall in the northwest of Australia over recent decades are attributed to climate

Just out | High-quality fossil dates support a synchronous, Late Holocene extinction of devils and thylacines in mainland Australia @ Biology Letters

Just out @ Biology Letters High-quality fossil dates support a synchronous, Late Holocene extinction of devils and thylacines in mainland Australia Author(s) Lauren C. White, Frédérik Saltré, Corey J. A. Bradshaw, Jeremy J. Austin Abstract: The last large marsupial carnivores—the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilis harrisii) and thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus)—went extinct on mainland Australia during the mid-Holocene. Based on the youngest fossil dates (approx. 3500 years before present, BP), these extinctions are often considered synchronous

On the News | USA | La Brea Tar Pits Museum Bracing for a Flood of Fossils This Summer @ Los Angeles Magazine

On the News @ Los Angeles Magazine Title:  La Brea Tar Pits Museum Bracing for a Flood of Fossils This Summer Matthew Segal Excerpt: “The La Brea Tar Pits know no mercy. The world’s most productive urban paleontological dig, they’ve yielded a stockpile of fossils that spill over from the main galleries of the La Brea Tar Pits Museum and into the lab and the cabinets and lockers that line