Cambrian

Just out | Divaricate patterns in Cambro-Ordovician obolid brachiopods from Gondwana @ Historical Biology

Just out @ Historical Biology Divaricate patterns in Cambro-Ordovician obolid brachiopods from Gondwana Author(s) M. Mergl, İ. Hoşgör, I. O. Yilmaz, S. Zamora & J. Colmenar Abstract: A new brachiopod species, Westonia mardini, from the Furongian of Turkey and a new occurrence of Westonia urbiona from the Cambrian Series 3 of Iberian Peninsula are reported. These new finds of ‘westoniids’ collected in Gondwana allow the discussion of the functional morphology of

Just out | Traces of predation in the Cambrian @ Historical Biology

Just out @ Historical Biology Traces of predation in the Cambrian Author(s) Olev Vinn Abstract: Series two marks a revolution in Cambrian predation when new predators and new predation methods appeared, which led to general increase in predation intensities and in the diversity of prey groups. The number of bored taxa and taxa with the predation scars is similar in the Cambrian. Most of the borings are associated with brachiopods and

Just out | Trilobite extinctions, facies changes and the ROECE carbon isotope excursion at the Cambrian Series 2–3 boundary, Great Basin, western USA @ Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology

Just out @ Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology Trilobite extinctions, facies changes and the ROECE carbon isotope excursion at the Cambrian Series 2–3 boundary, Great Basin, western USA Author(s) Luke E. Faggetter, Paul B. Wignall, Sara B. Pruss, Robert J. Newton, Yadong Sun, Stephen F. Crowley Abstract: The mass extinction of the olenellid trilobites occurred around the Cambrian Series 2–Series 3 boundary. Like many other crises, it coincided with a negative carbon isotope

On the News | Time is running out to determine if China holds the world’s oldest animal fossils @ The Washington Post

On the News @ The Washington Post Title:  Time is running out to determine if China holds the world’s oldest animal fossils Excerpt: “The rocks of the Doushantuo Formation, in China’s Guizhou Province, are sprinkled with tiny, ancient fossils. They are no more than a millimeter in length. The 600-million-year-old organisms are preserved with such detail that the fossils, when freed from the rock in a chemical bath and scanned with X-rays, reveal

Just out | Euendoliths versus ambient inclusion trails from Early Cambrian Kuanchuanpu Formation, South China @ Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology

Just out @ Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology Euendoliths versus ambient inclusion trails from Early Cambrian Kuanchuanpu Formation, South China Author(s) Xiao-guang Yang, Jian Han, Xing Wang, James D. Schiffbauer, Kentaro Uesugi, Osamu Sasaki, Tsuyoshi Komiya Abstract: Abundant microstructures have been discovered in small skeletal fossils (SSFs) and embryo-like fossils collected from the Lower Cambrian Kuanchuanpu Formation (ca. 535 Ma) in Xixiang County, Shaanxi Province, China. These involve two co-occurring structures: (1) long, unbranched

Just out | Open Access The Weng'an Biota (Doushantuo Formation): an Ediacaran window on soft-bodied and multicellular microorganisms @ Journal of the Geological Society

Just out @ Journal of the Geological Society The Weng’an Biota (Doushantuo Formation): an Ediacaran window on soft-bodied and multicellular microorganisms Author(s) John A. Cunningham, Kelly Vargas, Zongjun Yin, Stefan Bengtson, Philip C. J. Donoghue Abstract: The Weng’an Biota is a fossil Konservat-Lagerstätte in South China that is c. 570 – 609 myr old and provides an unparalleled snapshot of marine life during the interval in which molecular clocks estimate

Called a “can opener sea monster” by the more imaginative reporters, Cambrian Tokummia katalepsis gen. et sp. nov., a large bivalved arthropod reported this Thursday in Nature from the Canadian Burgess Shale (see video), made headlines all over the world and clearly stands out amongst new species described. Invertebrate new species, especially beetles, are slightly dominant this week, although new fishes, arthropods, medium-size mammals, and mosses, are also reported. Ages are also diverse, but Mesozoic species (Cretaceous and Triassic) are dominant. The new species reported this week come from Africa (Kenya), America (Canada) Europe (Germany and Russia), and Asia (China, Kyrgyzstan and Myanmar).

On the News | Pincer-wielding 507m-year-old fossil sheds light on evolution of crabs @ The Guardian

On the News @ The Guardian Title:  Pincer-wielding 507m-year-old fossil sheds light on evolution of crabs Excerpt: “A fossilised ancient creature boasting huge pincers resembling can-openers, a hinged two-piece shell and more than 50 pairs of legs has been discovered, shedding light on the evolutionary past of a huge and diverse group of animals. Researchers say the creature, thought to have lived about 507 million years ago during the Cambrian

Just out | Burgess Shale fossils illustrate the origin of the mandibulate body plan @ Nature

Just out @ Nature Burgess Shale fossils illustrate the origin of the mandibulate body plan Author(s) Cédric Aria & Jean-Bernard Caron Abstract: Retracing the evolutionary history of arthropods has been one of the greatest challenges in biology. During the past decade, phylogenetic analyses of morphological and molecular data have coalesced towards the conclusion that Mandibulata, the most diverse and abundant group of animals, is a distinct clade from Chelicerata, in that its