Evolution

Just out | Out of the dark: 350 million years of conservatism and evolution in diel activity patterns in vertebrates @ Evolution

Just out @ Evolution Out of the dark: 350 million years of conservatism and evolution in diel activity patterns in vertebrates Author(s) Samantha R. Anderson, John J. Wiens Abstract: Many animals are active only during a particular time (e.g., day vs. night), a partitioning that may have important consequences for species coexistence. An open question is the extent to which this diel activity niche is evolutionarily conserved or labile. Here, we

Just out | Testing the molecular clock using mechanistic models of fossil preservation and molecular evolution @ Proceedings of the Royal Society B

Just out @ Proceedings of the Royal Society B Testing the molecular clock using mechanistic models of fossil preservation and molecular evolution Author(s) Rachel C. M. Warnock, Ziheng Yang, Philip C. J. Donoghue Abstract: Molecular sequence data provide information about relative times only, and fossil-based age constraints are the ultimate source of information about absolute times in molecular clock dating analyses. Thus, fossil calibrations are critical to molecular clock dating, but competing methods are difficult to

Just out | Hierarchical complexity and the size limits of life @ Proceedings of the Royal Society B

Just out @ Proceedings of the Royal Society B Hierarchical complexity and the size limits of life Author(s) Noel A. Heim, Jonathan L. Payne, Seth Finnegan, Matthew L. Knope, Michał Kowalewski, S. Kathleen Lyons, Daniel W. McShea, Philip M. Novack-Gottshall, Felisa A. Smith, Steve C. Wang Abstract: Over the past 3.8 billion years, the maximum size of life has increased by approximately 18 orders of magnitude. Much of this increase is associated with two major evolutionary innovations: the evolution of eukaryotes from prokaryotic cells approximately 1.9 billion years ago (Ga),

Just out | The palaeogenetics of cat dispersal in the ancient world @ Nature Ecology & Evolution

Just out @ Nature Ecology & Evolution The palaeogenetics of cat dispersal in the ancient world Author(s) Claudio Ottoni, Wim Van Neer […] Eva-Maria Geigl Excerpt: The cat has long been important to human societies as a pest-control agent, object of symbolic value and companion animal, but little is known about its domestication process and early anthropogenic dispersal. Here we show, using ancient DNA analysis of geographically and temporally widespread

Just out | Pre-Quaternary divergence and subsequent radiation explain longitudinal patterns of genetic and morphological variation in the striped skink, Heremites vittatus @ BMC Evolutionary Biology

Just out @ BMC Evolutionary Biology Pre-Quaternary divergence and subsequent radiation explain longitudinal patterns of genetic and morphological variation in the striped skink, Heremites vittatus Author(s) Felix Baier, Andreas Schmitz, Hedwig Sauer-Gürth and Michael Wink Abstract: Background Many animal and plant species in the Middle East and northern Africa have a predominantly longitudinal distribution, extending from Iran and Turkey along the eastern Mediterranean coast into northern Africa. These species are potentially characterized by longitudinal patterns

On the News | De-extinction, nomenclature, and the law @ Science

On the News @ Science Title:  De-extinction, nomenclature, and the law Norman Wagner, Axel Hochkirch, Henrike Martin, Daniela Matenaar, Katja Rohde, Frank Wacht, Charlotte Wesch, Sarah Wirtz, Roland Klein, Stefan Lötters, Alexander Proelss, Michael Veith Summary: The concept of de-extinction, aimed at restoration of extinct species, is controversial. Improvements in de-extinction techniques (back-breeding, cloning, and genomic engineering) now provide the opportunity to attempt to resurrect extinct species. Up to 25 extinct

Just out | Infrasonic and Ultrasonic Hearing Evolved after the Emergence of Modern Whales @ Current Biology

Just out @ Current Biology Infrasonic and Ultrasonic Hearing Evolved after the Emergence of Modern Whales Author(s) Mickaël J. Mourlam, Maeva J. Orliac Abstract: Mysticeti (baleen whales) and Odontoceti (toothed whales) today greatly differ in their hearing abilities: Mysticeti are presumed to be sensitive to infrasonic noises, whereas Odontoceti are sensitive to ultrasonic sounds. Two competing hypotheses exist regarding the attainment of hearing abilities in modern whales: ancestral low-frequency sensitivity or

Just out | Transoceanic origin of microendemic and flightless New Caledonian weevils @ Royal Society Open Science

Just out @ Royal Society Open Science Transoceanic origin of microendemic and flightless New Caledonian weevils Author(s) Emmanuel F. A. Toussaint, Rene Tänzler, Michael Balke, Alexander Riedel Abstract: The origin of the astonishing New Caledonian biota continues to fuel a heated debate among advocates of a Gondwanan relict scenario and defenders of late oceanic dispersal. Here, we study the origin of New Caledonian Trigonopterus flightless weevils using a multimarker molecular phylogeny.

Just out | The evolution of vertebrate eye size across an environmental gradient: phenotype does not predict genotype in a Trinidadian killifish @ Evolution

Just out @ Evolution The evolution of vertebrate eye size across an environmental gradient: phenotype does not predict genotype in a Trinidadian killifish Author(s) Shannon M. Beston, Elijah Wostl, Matthew R. Walsh Abstract: Vertebrates exhibit substantial variation in eye size. Eye size correlates positively with visual capacity and behaviors that enhance fitness, such as predator avoidance. This foreshadows a connection between predation and eye size evolution. Yet, the conditions that favor

Just out | Cooperative interactions within the family enhance the capacity for evolutionary change in body size @ Nature Ecology and Evolution

Just out @ Nature Ecology and Evolution Cooperative interactions within the family enhance the capacity for evolutionary change in body size Author(s) Benjamin J. M. Jarrett, Matthew Schrader, Darren Rebar, Thomas M. Houslay & Rebecca M. Kilner Abstract: Classical models of evolution seldom predict the rate at which populations evolve in the wild. One explanation is that the social environment affects how traits change in response to natural selection. Here