Paleobiology

Just out | Morphology of the Middle Ear Ossicles in the Rodent Perimys (Neoepiblemidae) and a Comprehensive Anatomical and Morphometric Study of the Phylogenetic Transformations of these Structures in Caviomorphs @ Journal of Mammalian Evolution

Just out @ Journal of Mammalian Evolution Morphology of the Middle Ear Ossicles in the Rodent Perimys (Neoepiblemidae) and a Comprehensive Anatomical and Morphometric Study of the Phylogenetic Transformations of these Structures in Caviomorphs Author(s) Leonardo Kerber, Marcelo R. Sánchez-Villagra Abstract: The extinct clade of caviomorph rodents Neoepiblemidae includes forms that lived in South America from the early Miocene to Pliocene. Among them is Perimys. The exceptional preservation of ear ossicles in this rodent is described and analyzed in

Just out | The evolution of tail weaponization in amniotes @ Proceedings of the Royal Society B

Just out @ Proceedings of the Royal Society B The evolution of tail weaponization in amniotes Author(s) Victoria M. Arbour, Lindsay E. Zanno Abstract: Weaponry, for the purpose of intraspecific combat or predator defence, is one of the most widespread animal adaptations, yet the selective pressures and constraints governing its phenotypic diversity and skeletal regionalization are not well understood. Here, we investigate the evolution of tail weaponry in amniotes, a rare

Just out | Late Cretaceous marine arthropods relied on terrestrial organic matter as a food source: Geochemical evidence from the Coon Creek Lagerstätte in the Mississippi Embayment @ Geobiology

Just out @ Geobiology Late Cretaceous marine arthropods relied on terrestrial organic matter as a food source: Geochemical evidence from the Coon Creek Lagerstätte in the Mississippi Embayment Author(s) M. B. Vrazo, A. F. Diefendorf, B. E. Crowley, A. D. Czaja Abstract: The Upper Cretaceous Coon Creek Lagerstätte of Tennessee, USA, is known for its extremely well-preserved mollusks and decapod crustaceans. However, the depositional environment of this unit, particularly its distance

Just out | Avian egg shape: Form, function, and evolution @ Science

Just out @ Science Avian egg shape: Form, function, and evolution Author(s) Mary Caswell Stoddard, Ee Hou Yong, Derya Akkaynak, Catherine Sheard, Joseph A. Tobias, L. Mahadevan Abstract: Avian egg shape is generally explained as an adaptation to life history, yet we currently lack a global synthesis of how egg-shape differences arise and evolve. Here, we apply morphometric, mechanistic, and macroevolutionary analyses to the egg shapes of 1400 bird species. We characterize egg-shape diversity in

Just out | Hidden morphological diversity among early tetrapods @ Nature

Just out @ Nature Hidden morphological diversity among early tetrapods Author(s) Jason D. Pardo, Matt Szostakiwskyj, Per E. Ahlberg & Jason S. Anderson Abstract: Phylogenetic analysis of early tetrapod evolution has resulted in a consensus across diverse data sets in which the tetrapod stem group is a relatively homogenous collection of medium- to large-sized animals showing a progressive loss of ‘fish’ characters as they become increasingly terrestrial, whereas the crown group demonstrates marked

Just out | Testing the molecular clock using mechanistic models of fossil preservation and molecular evolution @ Proceedings of the Royal Society B

Just out @ Proceedings of the Royal Society B Testing the molecular clock using mechanistic models of fossil preservation and molecular evolution Author(s) Rachel C. M. Warnock, Ziheng Yang, Philip C. J. Donoghue Abstract: Molecular sequence data provide information about relative times only, and fossil-based age constraints are the ultimate source of information about absolute times in molecular clock dating analyses. Thus, fossil calibrations are critical to molecular clock dating, but competing methods are difficult to

Just out | Hierarchical complexity and the size limits of life @ Proceedings of the Royal Society B

Just out @ Proceedings of the Royal Society B Hierarchical complexity and the size limits of life Author(s) Noel A. Heim, Jonathan L. Payne, Seth Finnegan, Matthew L. Knope, Michał Kowalewski, S. Kathleen Lyons, Daniel W. McShea, Philip M. Novack-Gottshall, Felisa A. Smith, Steve C. Wang Abstract: Over the past 3.8 billion years, the maximum size of life has increased by approximately 18 orders of magnitude. Much of this increase is associated with two major evolutionary innovations: the evolution of eukaryotes from prokaryotic cells approximately 1.9 billion years ago (Ga),

Just out | Heritability: the link between development and the microevolution of molar tooth form @ Historical Biology

Just out @ Historical Biology Heritability: the link between development and the microevolution of molar tooth form Author(s) P. David Polly & Orin B. Mock Abstract: The developmental gene expression, morphogenesis, and population variation in mammalian molar teeth has become increasingly well understood, providing a model system for synthesizing evolution and developmental genetics. In this study, we estimated additive genetic covariances in molar shape (G) using parent-offspring regression in Cryptotis parva, the Least Shrew.

Just out | Dental eruption and growth in Hyracoidea (Mammalia, Afrotheria) @ Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology

Just out @ Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology Dental eruption and growth in Hyracoidea (Mammalia, Afrotheria) Author(s) Robert J. Asher, Gregg F. Gunnell, Erik R. Seiffert, David Pattinson, Rodolphe Tabuce, Lionel Hautier & Hesham M. Sallam Abstract: We investigated dental homologies, development, and growth in living and fossil hyracoids and tested if hyracoids and other mammals show correlations between eruption patterns, gestation time, and age at maturity. Unlike living species, fossil hyracoids simultaneously possess replaced P1 and canine teeth.

Just out | Disentangling faunal skeletal profiles. A new probabilistic framework @ Historical Biology 

Just out @ Historical Biology  Disentangling faunal skeletal profiles. A new probabilistic framework Author(s) Ana B. Marín-Arroyo & David Ocio Abstract: Faunal skeletal profiles from archaeological assemblages have been long analysed regarding differential transport of carcasses to infer hunting preferences, human mobility, or even dietary stress. However, the existence of several possible accumulating agents, together with the effect of bone attrition, is known to introduce a potential bias, thus hindering the possibilities