Paleoecology

Just out | Island biodiversity conservation needs palaeoecology @ Nature Ecology & Evolution

Just out @ Nature Ecology & Evolution Island biodiversity conservation needs palaeoecology Author(s) Sandra Nogué, Lea de Nascimento, Cynthia A. Froyd, Janet M. Wilmshurst, Erik J. de Boer, Emily E. D. Coffey, Robert J. Whittaker, José María Fernández-Palacios & Kathy J. Willis Abstract: The discovery and colonization of islands by humans has invariably resulted in their widespread ecological transformation. The small and isolated populations of many island taxa, and their evolution

Just out | Effects of long term nutrient and climate variability on subfossil Cladocera in a deep, subalpine lake (Lake Garda, northern Italy) @ Journal of Paleolimnology

Just out @ Journal of Paleolimnology Effects of long term nutrient and climate variability on subfossil Cladocera in a deep, subalpine lake (Lake Garda, northern Italy) Author(s) Manuela Milan, Christian Bigler, Monica Tolotti, Krystyna Szeroczyńska Abstract: Albeit subfossil Cladocera remains are considered as a reliable proxy for tracking historical lake development, they have been scarcely studied in large subalpine lakes south of the Alps. In this study, subfossil Cladocera remains from Lake Garda in northern

Just out | Foraminifera as markers of Holocene sea-level fluctuations and water depths of ancient harbours — A case study from the Bay of Elaia (W Turkey) @ Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology

Just out @ Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology Foraminifera as markers of Holocene sea-level fluctuations and water depths of ancient harbours — A case study from the Bay of Elaia (W Turkey) Author(s) Martin Seeliger, Anna Pint, Peter Frenzel, Stefan Feuser, Felix Pirson, Svenja Riedesel, Helmut Brückner Abstract: The absence of common sea-level indicators in the study area of Elaia, Pergamum’s harbour city in Hellenistic and Roman times, forced to establish a new reliable indicator, which was found

Just out | Increase in predator-prey size ratios throughout the Phanerozoic history of marine ecosystems @ Science

Just out @ Science Increase in predator-prey size ratios throughout the Phanerozoic history of marine ecosystems Author(s) Adiël A. Klompmaker, Michał Kowalewski, John Warren Huntley, Seth Finnegan Abstract: The escalation hypothesis posits that predation by increasingly powerful and metabolically active carnivores has been a major driver of metazoan evolution. We test a key tenet of this hypothesis by analyzing predatory drill holes in fossil marine shells, which provide a ~500-million-year

Just out | Seaweed morphology and ecology during the great animal diversification events of the early Paleozoic: A tale of two floras @ Geobiology

Just out @ Geobiology Seaweed morphology and ecology during the great animal diversification events of the early Paleozoic: A tale of two floras Author(s) S. T. LoDuca, N. Bykova, M. Wu, S. Xiao, Y. Zhao Abstract: Non-calcified marine macroalgae (“seaweeds”) play a variety of key roles in the modern Earth system, and it is likely that they were also important players in the geological past, particularly during critical transitions such

Just out | Litho- and biostratigraphy, facies patterns and depositional sequences of the Cenomanian-Turonian deposits in the Ksour Mountains (Saharan Atlas, Algeria) @ Cretaceous Research

Just out @ Cretaceous Research Litho- and biostratigraphy, facies patterns and depositional sequences of the Cenomanian-Turonian deposits in the Ksour Mountains (Saharan Atlas, Algeria) Author(s) Madani Benyoucef, Kaddour Mebarki, Bruno Ferré, Mohammed Adaci, Luc Georges Bulot, Delphine Desmares, Loïc Villier, Mustapha Bensalah, Camille Frau, Christina Ifrim, Fatima-Zohra Malti Abstract: The Cenomanian-Turonian deposits exposed in the Ksour Mountains, western part of the Saharan Atlas (Algeria), document marine shelf environments that had been thriving

Just out | Neoichnology of Chalk cobbles from north Norfolk, England: implications for taphonomy and palaeoecology @ Proceedings of the Geologists' Association

Just out @ Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association Neoichnology of Chalk cobbles from north Norfolk, England: implications for taphonomy and palaeoecology Author(s) Stephen K. Donovan Abstract: The study of marine biota of the North Sea from the perspective of its relevance to palaeontology (Aktuopaläontologie) has enabled modern patterns and processes to be identified that can also be recognised in ancient communities. A collection of Chalk cobbles from the coast of north

Just out | Calibration of the repeatability of foraminiferal test size and shape measures with recommendations for future use @ Marine Micropaleontology

Just out @ Marine Micropaleontology Calibration of the repeatability of foraminiferal test size and shape measures with recommendations for future use Author(s) Anieke Brombacher, Paul A. Wilson, Thomas H.G. Ezard Abstract: The fossil record of planktonic foraminifera is ideally suited to defining stratigraphic age controls and exploring fundamental questions in evolutionary biology due to its excellent preservation potential that yields continuous, high-resolution fossil archives of large numbers of individuals. For full

Just out | Summer temperature variability inferred from subfossil chironomid assemblages from the south-east margin of the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau for the last 5000 years @ The Holocene

Just out @ The Holocene Summer temperature variability inferred from subfossil chironomid assemblages from the south-east margin of the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau for the last 5000 years Author(s) Jie Chang, Enlou Zhang, Enfeng Liu, James Shulmeister Abstract: We present a quantitative mean July temperature record spanning the last c. 5000 years from an alpine lake in south-western China. The reconstruction is based on the application of an established chironomid-based inference model using

Just out | Cooperative interactions within the family enhance the capacity for evolutionary change in body size @ Nature Ecology and Evolution

Just out @ Nature Ecology and Evolution Cooperative interactions within the family enhance the capacity for evolutionary change in body size Author(s) Benjamin J. M. Jarrett, Matthew Schrader, Darren Rebar, Thomas M. Houslay & Rebecca M. Kilner Abstract: Classical models of evolution seldom predict the rate at which populations evolve in the wild. One explanation is that the social environment affects how traits change in response to natural selection. Here