Paleontological Methods

Just out | Early Cambrian animal diapause embryos revealed by X-ray tomography @ Geology

Just out @ Geology Early Cambrian animal diapause embryos revealed by X-ray tomography Author(s) Zongjun Yin, Duoduo Zhao, Bing Pan, Fangchen Zhao, Han Zeng, Guoxiang Li, David J. Bottjer, Maoyan Zhu Abstract: Discoveries of animal embryos have profoundly improved our understanding of the early evolution of animal development. However, the fossil record of early animal embryos is extremely sparse. Here we present some three-dimensionally (3-D) phosphatized Archaeooides from the basal Cambrian in southern Shaanxi Province, China. The 3-D reconstructions

Just out | New Paleobiology issue with 10 new Paleontology papers

Just out @ Paleobiology Paleontological Papers (Volume Volume 44 / Issue 1, February 2018): Detecting diversification rates in relation to preservation and tectonic history from simulated fossil records, Tara M. Smiley (DOI: 10.1017/pab.2017.28, Published Online on 24 January 2018) (OPEN ACCESS) Reconstructing geographic range-size dynamics from fossil data, Simon A. F. Darroch, Erin E. Saupe (DOI: 10.1017/pab.2017.25, Published Online on 18 January 2018) Spatial analyses of Ediacaran communities at Mistaken Point,

Just out | Diversification of insects since the Devonian: a new approach based on morphological disparity of mouthparts @ Nature Scientific Reports

Just out @ Nature Scientific Reports Diversification of insects since the Devonian: a new approach based on morphological disparity of mouthparts Author(s) Patricia Nel, Sylvain Bertrand & André Nel Abstract: The majority of the analyses of the evolutionary history of the megadiverse class Insecta are based on the documented taxonomic palaeobiodiversity. A different approach, poorly investigated, is to focus on morphological disparity, linked to changes in the organisms’ functioning. Here we establish a

On the News | Australia | Bolting birds help reveal dinosaur gait @ The University of Queensland News

On the News @ The University of Queensland News Title:  Bolting birds help reveal dinosaur gait Excerpt: “Research into how modern birds run and walk is taking an international team of palaeontologists and biomechanics experts a step closer to accurately reconstructing the way extinct dinosaurs moved. The University of Queensland and Queensland Museum-led team has used high-speed video cameras and force-plates to study how a variety of ground-dwelling birds, ranging from

On the News | Australia | Scientists chase down dinosaur movements by watching turkeys sprint @ The Camberra Times

On the News @ The Camberra Times Title:  Scientists chase down dinosaur movements by watching turkeys sprint Ruth McCosker Excerpt: “Researchers have built running tracks for turkeys, emus and ibises and other birds in the race to discover how dinosaurs moved. Birds had previously been used to explore the movement of dinosaurs but not to the extent of this latest research, in which 12 bird species were observed sprinting to explore

Just out | Letting the ‘cat’ out of the bag: pouch young development of the extinct Tasmanian tiger revealed by X-ray computed tomography @ Royal Society Open Society

Just out @ Royal Society Open Society Letting the ‘cat’ out of the bag: pouch young development of the extinct Tasmanian tiger revealed by X-ray computed tomography Author(s) Axel H. Newton, Frantisek Spoutil, Jan Prochazka, Jay R. Black, Kathryn Medlock, Robert N. Paddle, Marketa Knitlova, Christy A. Hipsley, Andrew J. Pask Abstract: The Tasmanian tiger or thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) was an iconic Australian marsupial predator that was hunted to extinction in the early 1900s. Despite sharing striking similarities

Just out | Computed tomography scanning as a tool for linking the skeletal and otolith-based fossil records of teleost fishes @ Palaeontology

Just out @ Palaeontology Computed tomography scanning as a tool for linking the skeletal and otolith-based fossil records of teleost fishes Author(s) Werner Schwarzhans, Hermione T. Beckett, Jason D. Schein, Matt Friedman Abstract: Micro-computed tomography (μCT) scanning now represents a standard tool for non-destructive study of internal or concealed structure in fossils. Here we report on otoliths found in situ during routine μCT scanning of three-dimensionally preserved skulls of Palaeogene and Cretaceous fishes.

Just out | How should we estimate diversity in the fossil record? Testing richness estimators using sampling-standardised discovery curves @ Methods in Ecology and Evolution

Just out @ Methods in Ecology and Evolution How should we estimate diversity in the fossil record? Testing richness estimators using sampling-standardised discovery curves Author(s) Roger A Close, Serjoscha W Evers, John Alroy, Richard J Butler Abstract: 1.To infer genuine patterns of biodiversity change in the fossil record, we must be able to accurately estimate relative differences in numbers of taxa (richness) despite considerable variation in sampling between time intervals.

Just out | Low-latitudinal standard Permian radiolarian biostratigraphy for multiple purposes with Unitary Association, Graphic Correlation, and Bayesian inference methods @ Earth-Science Reviews

Just out @ Earth-Science Reviews Low-latitudinal standard Permian radiolarian biostratigraphy for multiple purposes with Unitary Association, Graphic Correlation, and Bayesian inference methods Author(s) Yifan Xiao, Noritoshi Suzuki, Weihong He Abstract: The ideal goal of biostratigraphic studies is to make stratigraphic ranges of all species clear and to fix globally synchronous biohorizons as age controls. However, it is difficult to achieve this goal in simple, traditional ways, and so a new solution is proposed

Just out | A 3D anatomical atlas of appendage musculature in the chelicerate arthropod Limulus polyphemus @ PLOS one

Just out @ PLOS one A 3D anatomical atlas of appendage musculature in the chelicerate arthropod Limulus polyphemus Author(s) Russell D. C. Bicknell, Ada J. Klinkhamer, Richard J. Flavel, Stephen Wroe, John R. Paterson Abstract: Limulus polyphemus, an archetypal chelicerate taxon, has interested both biological and paleontological researchers due to its unique suite of anatomical features and as a useful modern analogue for fossil arthropod groups. To assist the study and documentation of this