Paleontology History

Just out | How has our knowledge of dinosaur diversity through geologic time changed through research history? @ PeerJ

Just out @ PeerJ How has our knowledge of dinosaur diversity through geologic time changed through research history? Author(s) Jonathan P. Tennant​, Alfio Alessandro Chiarenza​, Matthew Baron Abstract: Assessments of dinosaur macroevolution at any given time can be biased by the historical publication record. Recent studies have analysed patterns in dinosaur diversity that are based on secular variations in the numbers of published taxa. Many of these have employed a range of approaches that account

On the News | USA | From the Archives: The Cabazon dinosaur builder @ Los Angeles Times

On the News @ Los Angeles Times Title:  From the Archives: The Cabazon dinosaur builder Scott Harrison Excerpt: “Claude K. Bell, a Knott’s Berry Farm sculptor and portrait artist, opened the Wheel Inn cafe in 1958. To attract customers to the restaurant in Cabazon, he began building dinosaurs. Bell thought big. “The brontosaurus is just the beginning.” he said, ” I’ve got 62 acres alongside the freeway. In the next

Just out | The skeletons of Cyclops and Lestrigons: misinterpretation of Quaternary vertebrates as remains of the mythological giants @ Historical Biology

Just out @ Historical Biology The skeletons of Cyclops and Lestrigons: misinterpretation of Quaternary vertebrates as remains of the mythological giants Author(s) Marco Romano & Marco Avanzini Abstract: The myth of giants as first inhabitants of countries is a common legend shared by different cultures. In this paper, we highlight that one of the determining factors of the origination of the myth was the discovery of large vertebrate bones (largely Cenozoic), initially interpreted

Julia Sankey and Jacob Biewer (California State University) just released “The Giant Spike-Toothed Salmon and Other Extinct Wildlife of Central California”, a new book on the giant, spike toothed salmon and massive tortoises in California. Written for a general audience, with excellent illustrations, the book is readly available through Amazon. It portrays the California of 5 million years ago and the very weird animals inhabiting it. Go back in time and learn about

Just out | The contribution of fossils to chronostratigraphy, 150 years after Albert Oppel @ Lethaia

Just out @ Lethaia The contribution of fossils to chronostratigraphy, 150 years after Albert Oppel Author(s) Marco Balini, Annalisa Ferretti, Stan Finney, Simonetta Monechi Abstract: The 150th anniversary of the death of Albert Oppel (1831–65) provided the opportunity to celebrate this outstanding stratigrapher with a Thematic Issue dedicated to the importance of fossils for dating and correlating of sedimentary rocks. In this issue, we analyse Oppel’s significant contribution to modern chronostratigraphy, before

On the News | UK | Palaeontologist William Fox's dinosaur fossil finds displayed @ BBC News

On the News @ BBC News Title:  Palaeontologist William Fox’s dinosaur fossil finds displayed Excerpt: “Fossils discovered by a Victorian clergyman who had four dinosaurs named after him are being exhibited on the Isle of Wight. Among Rev William Fox’s finds was one of the first, almost complete dinosaur fossils – a partial skeleton of a plant-eating Hypsilophodon foxii. Some of his fossils are being displayed at Sandown’s Dinosaur Isle Museum.

On the News | When Dinosaurs Went Bad @ Discover Magazine

On the News @ Discover Magazine Title:  When Dinosaurs Went Bad Excerpt: “In 1842, English anatomist Richard Owen proposed the term dinosauria for the strange animal fossils he and colleagues had begun to study. Owen drew from ancient Greek to create the word: deinos, meaning “terrible” in the awesome-to-behold sense, and sauros, “reptile” or “lizard.” The truth is, those early paleontologists — and generations of their successors — got those