Vertebrate Paleontology

Just out | δ18O-derived incubation temperatures of oviraptorosaur eggs @ Palaeontology

Just out @ Palaeontology δ18O-derived incubation temperatures of oviraptorosaur eggs Author(s) Romain Amiot, Xu Wang, Shuo Wang, Christophe Lécuyer, Jean-Michel Mazin, Jinyou Mo, Jean-Pierre Flandrois, François Fourel, Xiaolin Wang, Xing Xu, Zhijun Zhang, Zhonghe Zhou Abstract: In order to determine the incubation temperature of eggs laid by non-avian dinosaurs, we analysed the oxygen isotope compositions of both eggshell carbonate (δ18Oc) and embryo bone phosphate (δ18Op) from seven oviraptorosaur eggs with preserved in

Just out | Astragali of Pakicetidae and other early-to-middle Eocene archaeocetes (Mammalia, Cetacea) of Pakistan: locomotion and habitat in the initial stages of whale evolution @ PalZ

Just out @ PalZ Astragali of Pakicetidae and other early-to-middle Eocene archaeocetes (Mammalia, Cetacea) of Pakistan: locomotion and habitat in the initial stages of whale evolution Author(s) Philip D. Gingerich, Kurt Heissig, Ryan M. Bebej, Wighart von Koenigswald Abstract: Richard Dehm and colleagues of the Bayerische Staatssammlung für Paläontologie und Geologie in Munich made an important collection of early-to-middle Eocene mammals at Ganda Kas in Pakistan during the winter of 1955/56. The genera and species Ichthyolestes pinfoldi and Gandakasia potens were named

Just out | A fossil unicorn crestfish (Teleostei, Lampridiformes, Lophotidae) from the Eocene of Iran @ PeerJ

Just out @ PeerJ A fossil unicorn crestfish (Teleostei, Lampridiformes, Lophotidae) from the Eocene of Iran Author(s) Donald Davesne Abstract: Lophotidae, or crestfishes, is a family of rare deep-sea teleosts characterised by an enlarged horn-like crest on the forehead. They are poorly represented in the fossil record, by only three described taxa. One specimen attributed to Lophotidae has been described from the pelagic fauna of the middle-late Eocene Zagros Basin, Iran. Originally

Just out | The comparative osteology of Plesiochelys bigleri n. sp., a new coastal marine turtle from the Late Jurassic of Porrentruy (Switzerland) @ PeerJ

Just out @ PeerJ The comparative osteology of Plesiochelys bigleri n. sp., a new coastal marine turtle from the Late Jurassic of Porrentruy (Switzerland) Author(s) Christian Püntener, Jérémy Anquetin, Jean-Paul Billon-Bruyat Abstract: Background During the Late Jurassic, several groups of eucryptodiran turtles inhabited the shallow epicontinental seas of Western Europe. Plesiochelyidae are an important part of this first radiation of crown-group turtles into coastal marine ecosystems. Fossils of Plesiochelyidae occur in many European localities, and are especially abundant

Just out | Frequency of decompression illness among recent and extinct mammals and “reptiles”: a review @ The Science of Nature

Just out @ The Science of Nature Frequency of decompression illness among recent and extinct mammals and “reptiles”: a review Author(s) Agnete Weinreich Carlsen Abstract: The frequency of decompression illness was high among the extinct marine “reptiles” and very low among the marine mammals. Signs of decompression illness are still found among turtles but whales and seals are unaffected. In humans, the risk of decompression illness is five times increased in individuals with

Just out | Europatitan eastwoodi, a new sauropod from the lower Cretaceous of Iberia in the initial radiation of somphospondylans in Laurasia @ PeerJ

Just out @ PeerJ Europatitan eastwoodi, a new sauropod from the lower Cretaceous of Iberia in the initial radiation of somphospondylans in Laurasia Author(s) Fidel Torcida Fernández-Baldor, José Ignacio Canudo, Pedro Huerta, Miguel Moreno-Azanza, Diego Montero Abstract: The sauropod of El Oterillo II is a specimen that was excavated from the Castrillo de la Reina Formation (Burgos, Spain), late Barremian–early Aptian, in the 2000s but initially remained undescribed. A tooth and elements of the axial skeleton, and the scapular and

Just out | Revision of “Balaena” belgica reveals a new right whale species, the possible ancestry of the northern right whale, Eubalaena glacialis, and the ages of divergence for the living right whale species @ PeerJ

Just out @ PeerJ Revision of “Balaena” belgica reveals a new right whale species, the possible ancestry of the northern right whale, Eubalaena glacialis, and the ages of divergence for the living right whale species Author(s) Michelangelo Bisconti, Olivier Lambert, Mark Bosselaers Abstract: In 1941, Abel established Balaena belgica based on a series of fused cervical vertebrae and citing other cranial fragments from the late Neogene of the Antwerp harbor (northern Belgium). Later, Plisnier-Ladame & Quinet (1969) added a neurocranium and other skeletal

Just out | Complex neuroanatomy in the rostrum of the Isle of Wight theropod Neovenator salerii @ Nature Ecology & Evolution

Just out @ Nature Ecology & Evolution Complex neuroanatomy in the rostrum of the Isle of Wight theropod Neovenator salerii Author(s) Chris Tijani Barker, Darren Naish, Elis Newham, Orestis L. Katsamenis & Gareth Dyke Abstract: The discovery of large, complex, internal canals within the rostra of fossil reptiles has been linked with an enhanced tactile function utilised in an aquatic context, so far in pliosaurids, the Cretaceous theropod Spinosaurus, and the related spinosaurid Baryonyx. Here, we report the presence

On the News | USA | From the Archives: The Cabazon dinosaur builder @ Los Angeles Times

On the News @ Los Angeles Times Title:  From the Archives: The Cabazon dinosaur builder Scott Harrison Excerpt: “Claude K. Bell, a Knott’s Berry Farm sculptor and portrait artist, opened the Wheel Inn cafe in 1958. To attract customers to the restaurant in Cabazon, he began building dinosaurs. Bell thought big. “The brontosaurus is just the beginning.” he said, ” I’ve got 62 acres alongside the freeway. In the next

On the News | Switzerland | Découverte de Nouvelles Traces de Dinosaure @ Le Matin

On the News @ Le Matin Title:  Découverte de Nouvelles Traces de Dinosaure Excerpt: “L’environnement du Jura au Jurassique supérieur, il y a environ 152 millions d’années, se compare à celui des Bahamas d’aujourd’hui. Les variations du niveau marin y ont permis l’émersion des terres, et donc l’installation prolongée de populations de dinosaures ainsi que la préservation de leurs empreintes. Le nouveau type de traces, baptisé Jurabrontes curtedulensis, est validé