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Just out | Complex neuroanatomy in the rostrum of the Isle of Wight theropod Neovenator salerii @ Nature Ecology & Evolution

Just out @ Nature Ecology & Evolution Complex neuroanatomy in the rostrum of the Isle of Wight theropod Neovenator salerii Author(s) Chris Tijani Barker, Darren Naish, Elis Newham, Orestis L. Katsamenis & Gareth Dyke Abstract: The discovery of large, complex, internal canals within the rostra of fossil reptiles has been linked with an enhanced tactile function utilised in an aquatic context, so far in pliosaurids, the Cretaceous theropod Spinosaurus, and the related spinosaurid Baryonyx. Here, we report the presence

On the News | UK | Dinosaurs’ sensitive snouts enabled courtship ‘face stroking’, study suggests @ The Guardian

On the News @ The Guardian Title:  Dinosaurs’ sensitive snouts enabled courtship ‘face stroking’, study suggests Excerpt: “Dinosaurs’ faces might have been much more sensitive than previously thought and may have helped them feed more carefully or woo potential mates, according to new research. Experts from the University of Southampton used advanced X-ray and 3D-imaging techniques to look inside the fossilised skull of Neovenator salerii – a large carnivorous land-based dinosaur found

Just out | A revision of some British Lower Bajocian stephanoceratid ammonites @ Proceedings of the Geologists' Association

Just out @ Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association A revision of some British Lower Bajocian stephanoceratid ammonites Author(s) Robert B. Chandler, Volker Dietze, John Whicher Abstract: Members of the ammonite family Stephanoceratidae from the Middle Jurassic, Lower Bajocian, Laeviuscula to Humphriesianum zones of South West England are revised. These comprise faunas resulting from periodic migrations and possibly hybridization. The taxonomic positions of TelocerasMascke, 1907, Kumatostephanus Buckman, 1922, Gibbistephanus Buckman, 1928 and Pseudoteloceras Pavia and Fernández-López, 2016 are considered in the

Just out | Tribute to Percy Milton Butler 1912–2015 @ Historical Biology

Just out @ Historical Biology Tribute to Percy Milton Butler 1912–2015 Author(s) Jerry Hooker Excerpt: Percy Butler could be regarded as the champion of the study of mammalian teeth. In fact in his very long scientific career, he published many papers not only on modern and fossil mammalian dentitions, including those of humans, but also on the cranial and postcranial regions of extinct mammals. Moreover, his works also included the study

On the News | UK | The ancient mystery of St Hilda's 'snake stones': what do ammonites really look like? @ The Guardian

On the News @ The Guardian Title:  The ancient mystery of St Hilda’s ‘snake stones’: what do ammonites really look like? Mark Carnall Excerpt: “Think of a generic fossil and – alongside dinosaur skeletons or trilobites – it’s likely that the coiled shells of ammonites spring to mind. Ammonites are an extinct group of cephalopods, the mollusc group that contains octopuses, vampire squid, ‘squids’ (there are many different kinds of

On the News | UK | Meet Dean Lomax, Master of the Prehistoric ‘Death March’ @ Discover Magazine

On the News @ Discover Magazine Title:  Meet Dean Lomax, Master of the Prehistoric ‘Death March’ Jon Tennant Excerpt: “Paleontologists study creatures that have long ceased to be, all in the hopes of “resurrecting” the history of their lives on Earth. But paleontologist Dean Lomax, an Honorary Visiting Scientist at the University of Manchester, has made a name for himself recreating a very specific part of ancient creatures’ lives: their

Just out | Ecological changes in Pennsylvanian (Asturian and early Cantabrian) coal floras inferred from lycophyte microspore abundances @ Earth-Science Reviews

Just out @ Earth-Science Reviews Ecological changes in Pennsylvanian (Asturian and early Cantabrian) coal floras inferred from lycophyte microspore abundances Author(s) B.A. Thomasa, T.K. Dimitrova Abstract: The distribution and relative amounts of six genera of lycophyte microspores, Lycospora, Densosporites, Crassispora, Cirratriradites, Endosporites and Cadiospora, are compared in the Pennsylvanian coals from the Dobrudzha and Forest of Dean coalfields, clastic sediments from the Glace Bay borehole in the Cape Breton Coalfield, and

Just out | Paleogene origin of planktivory in the Batoidea @ Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology

Just out @ Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology Paleogene origin of planktivory in the Batoidea Author(s) Charlie J. Underwood, Matthew A. Kolmann & David J. Ward Abstract: The planktivorous mobulid rays are a sister group to, and descended from, rhinopterid and myliobatid rays that possess a dentition showing adaptations consistent with a specialized durophagous diet. Within the Paleocene and Eocene, there are several taxa that display dentitions apparently transitional between these extreme

Just out | Testing hypotheses of element loss and instability in the apparatus composition of complex conodonts: articulated skeletons of Hindeodus @ Proceedings of the Geologists' Association

Just out @ Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association Testing hypotheses of element loss and instability in the apparatus composition of complex conodonts: articulated skeletons of Hindeodus Author(s) Christopher J. Cleal Abstract: England has an exceptional range of Westphalian—Stephanian (late Bashkirian—Moscovian) fossil floras spanning some 10 million years. They represent vegetation growing in part of a swamp that covered large areas of tropical Euramerica and which was responsible for the removal of

On the News | Warwick Uni scientists uncover dinosaur teeth @ Leamington Observer

On the News @ Leamington Observer Title:  Warwick Uni scientists uncover dinosaur teeth Ian Hughes Excerpt: “Pioneering scanning technology developed at Warwick University has shed fresh light on the world’s oldest dinosaur. Research by scientists at WMG at the University of Warwick has revealed new teeth belonging to the world’s first scientifically-described dinosaur fossil of a Megalosaurus – over 200 years after it was first discovered. Professor Mark Williams at WMG