Just out | A new species of Carpolestes (Mammalia, Plesiadapoidea) from the late Paleocene of southern Wyoming: assessing changes in size and shape during the evolution of a key anatomical feature @ Historical Biology


Just out @ Historical Biology


A new species of Carpolestes (Mammalia, Plesiadapoidea) from the late Paleocene of southern Wyoming: assessing changes in size and shape during the evolution of a key anatomical feature


Author(s)

Spencer G. Mattingly, Oscar Sanisidro & K. Christopher Beard


Abstract:

A new and phylogenetically basal species of Carpolestes, the youngest and most derived genus of the plesiadapoid family Carpolestidae in North America, is described from a late Tiffanian (Ti-5) site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, USA. Carpolestids differ from closely related plesiadapoid clades in having an enlarged, multicuspidate, blade-like P4that is partly convergent on that of multituberculates and other mammals showing plagiaulacoid dental adaptations. With some notable exceptions, the evolutionary history of North American carpolestids is characterized by the progressive development of larger and more elaborate P4 blades through time. In particular, species of the monophyletic genus Carpolestes differ from species assigned to the earlier and apparently paraphyletic genus Carpodaptes in terms of both the size and shape of their P4. A geometric morphometric analysis reveals that, with respect to P4shape, the closest approximation to the highly derived morphology of Carpolestes is made by Carpodaptes hobackensis, which is one of the smallest known species of Carpodaptes. In contrast, the largest known species of Carpodaptes, Carpodaptes jepseni, has a P4 that falls within the metric range of variation for species of Carpolestes, yet Carpodaptes jepseni shows a uniquely derived P4 shape that seems to exclude it from any special phylogenetic relationship with Carpolestes. A phylogenetic analysis based on dental characters reconstructs Carpodaptes hobackensis as the sister group of the Carpolestes clade. Shape seems to have been a more important factor than size during the final transformation of the blade-like P4 of North American carpolestids.


Keywords: Tiffanian, geometric morphometrics, phylogenetics, Primatomorpha


DOI: 10.1080/08912963.2017.1328509


READ IT HERE: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08912963.2017.1328509


United States of America Placeholder
United States of America
Oceans and Antarctica Overlay_small _blank Placeholder
Oceans and Antarctica Overlay_small _blank
Read more about / USA
Read more about / America
Read more about / Paleocene
Read more about / Cenozoic
Read more about / Vertebrate Paleontology
Read more about / Today in Publishing

Lurdes Fonseca

Assistant Professor and Researcher at University of Lisbon
Sociologist (PhD), Paleontologist (Researcher in Micropaleontology), Majors in Sociology and Biology, Minor in Geology. Main interests in Paleontology: Microfossils, Molecular fossils, Paleobiology and Paleoecology. (read more about me)