Just out | A new stem bythinine in Cretaceous Burmese amber and early evolution of specialized predatory behaviour in pselaphine rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) @ Journal of Systematic Palaeontology


Just out @ Journal of Systematic Palaeontology


A new stem bythinine in Cretaceous Burmese amber and early evolution of specialized predatory behaviour in pselaphine rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae)


Author(s)

Zi-Wei Yin, Joseph Parker, Chen-Yang Cai, Di-Ying Huang & Li-Zhen Li


Abstract:

Comprising more than 10,000 valid species, the staphylinid subfamily Pselaphinae is a major element of epigean habitats, and among the most diverse groups of rove beetles. Pselaphinae is split basally into two principal clades: the small supertribe Faronitae, and its sister group, the hyper-diverse ‘higher Pselaphinae’ containing the remaining five supertribes. Deducing the origins and divergence times of major higher Pselaphinae clades requires direct fossil evidence. Here we describe a new pselaphine rove beetle, Cretobythus excavatus Yin, Parker & Cai gen. et sp. nov., based on a well-preserved individual embedded in mid-Cretaceous amber from Myanmar (Cenomanian, c. 99 Ma). Cretobythus does not obviously belong to any Recent tribe, but Bayesian phylogenetic placement using morphological characters supports a position within the stem-group of the tribe Bythinini, sister to Boreotethys Parker, a genus also recently described from Burmese amber. Together, Cretobythus + Boreotethys comprise the sister group of modern Bythinini. Despite some external similarities to Recent Bythinini, Cretobythus exhibits several plesiomorphic traits, including a generally flattened body plan, and metacoxae that are positioned close to the ventral midline. The resemblance in form of the enlarged maxillary palpi of Cretobythus to extant bythinines implies a similar function in prey capture, indicating that the unusual employment of the maxillary palps to trap moving prey in Bythinini had probably evolved by the mid-Cretaceous, at the latest.


Keywords: PselaphinaeBythinininew taxonfeeding behaviourMesozoic


DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2017.1313790


READ IT HERE: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14772019.2017.1313790

Lurdes Fonseca

Assistant Professor and Researcher at University of Lisbon
Sociologist (PhD), Paleontologist (Researcher in Micropaleontology), Majors in Sociology and Biology, Minor in Geology. Main interests in Paleontology: Microfossils, Molecular fossils, Paleobiology and Paleoecology. (read more about me)