Just out | Paleoecological evidence for decadal increase in phytoplankton biomass off northwestern Australia in response to climate change @ Ecology and Evolution


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Paleoecological evidence for decadal increase in phytoplankton biomass off northwestern Australia in response to climate change


Author(s)

Zineng Yuan, Dongyan Liu, John K. Keesing, Meixun Zhao, Shixin Guo, Yajun Peng, Hailong Zhang


Abstract:

Ocean warming can modify the phytoplankton biomass on decadal scales. Significant increases in sea surface temperature (SST) and rainfall in the northwest of Australia over recent decades are attributed to climate change. Here, we used four biomarker proxies (TEX86 index, long-chain n-alkanes, brassicasterol, and dinosterol) to reconstruct approximately 60-year variations of SST, terrestrial input, and diatom and dinoflagellate biomass in the coastal waters of the remote Kimberley region. The results showed that the most significant increases in SST and terrestrial input occurred since 1997, accompanied by an abrupt increase in diatom and dinoflagellate biomasses. Compared with the results before 1997, the average math formula temperature during 1997–2011 increased approximately 1°C, rainfall increased 248.2 mm, brassicasterol and dinosterol contents increased 8.5 and 1.7 times. Principal component analysis indicated that the warming SST played a more important role in the phytoplankton increase than increased rainfall and river discharge.


Keywords: math formula


DOI: 10.1002/ece3.3836


READ IT HERE: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.3836/full


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Lurdes Fonseca

Assistant Professor and Researcher at University of Lisbon
Sociologist (PhD), Paleontologist (Researcher in Micropaleontology), Majors in Sociology and Biology, Minor in Geology. Main interests in Paleontology: Microfossils, Molecular fossils, Paleobiology and Paleoecology. (read more about me)
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