Just out | Paucispecific macroinvertebrate communities in the Upper Cretaceous of El Hassana Dome (Abu Roash, Egypt): Environmental controls vs adaptive strategies @ Cretaceous Research


Just out @ Cretaceous Research


Title: 

Paucispecific macroinvertebrate communities in the Upper Cretaceous of El Hassana Dome (Abu Roash, Egypt): Environmental controls vs adaptive strategies


Author(s):

Ahmed Awad Abdelhady, Ramadan S.A. Mohamed


Abstract:

Based on rock and fossil data from the Upper Cretaceous of the El Hassana Dome (Abu Roash, Egypt), factors controlling facies architecture and the nature of biotopes are highlighted. The succession formed on a non-rimmed shelf, the architecture of which varied from an inner to an outer shelf setting upsection. Macrobenthic biotopes are reconstructed and their palaeoecological significance assessed using a novel ternary plot. Based on diversity and community structure (770 specimens assigned to 28 bivalve and gastropod taxa), four paucispecific associations are identified. These are: 1. the ‘Cucullaea’ Assemblage, a low-energy, soft-substrate, oligotrophic outer shelf environment with reduced terrigenous input dominated by infaunal bivalves and hexactinellid sponges; 2. the ‘Plicatula’ Assemblage, a low-energy, restricted inner shelf lagoonal setting with soupy substrates and dysoxia below the sediment-water interface dominated by plicatulid and ostreid bivalves, 3. the ‘Durania’ Assemblage, a high-energy, high-temperature, shoal environment dominated by elevator rudists with minor numbers of echinoids, corals and bryozoans, which together form several biostromes. and 4. The ‘Trochactaeon’ Assemblage, which share the same characteristics of the ‘Durania’ Assemblage. The paucispecific nature of these biotopes is indicative of different stress factors. Consequently, the predominant taxa exhibit different degrees of adaptive strategies. In addition to global sea level, local tectonics have significantly affected facies distribution and biotope structure. The shallower facies during the early Turonian and the dysoxia spanning the Coniacian–Santonian were linked to synsedimentary tectonics, which formed many barriers and led to circulation restrictions.


READ IT HERE:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667116302518

Lurdes Fonseca

Assistant Professor and Researcher at University of Lisbon
Sociologist (PhD), Paleontologist (Researcher in Micropaleontology), Majors in Sociology and Biology, Minor in Geology. Main interests in Paleontology: Microfossils, Molecular fossils, Paleobiology and Paleoecology. (read more about me)