Just out | Roveacrinids (Crinoidea, Roveacrinida) from the Cenomanian-Turonian of southwest Algeria (Saharan Atlas and Guir Basin) @ Annales de Paléontologie


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Roveacrinids (Crinoidea, Roveacrinida) from the Cenomanian-Turonian of southwest Algeria (Saharan Atlas and Guir Basin)


Author(s)

Bruno Ferré, Kaddour Mebarki, Madani Benyoucef, Loïc Villier, Luc Georges Bulot, Delphine Desmares, Houcine Boumediène Benachour, Lionel Marie


Abstract:

In the southwestern part of Algeria, the Cenomanian-Turonian marine deposits build up a prominent ledge in a perched syncline (Ksour Mountains, western Saharan Atlas) or at high radius of curvature (Guir Basin). The petrographical analysis of the Cenomanian-Turonian deposits of the Ksour Mountains and of the Guir Basin reveals unexpected assemblages of roveacrinoidal ossicles comparable with those formerly reported from the Tinrhert area. For the first time, isolated ossicles of genuine and undisputable Roveacrinidae are illustrated. Three sections, Djebel Rhoundjaia (western Saharan Atlas), Berridel and Kénadsa (Guir Basin), were scrutinized to recognize the microcrinoidal sections within the carbonate microfacies and to compile the successive occurrence of respective roveacrinid taxa (besides the classical search for standard index microfossils) in an attempt to pinpoint more precisely the position of the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary (C/T B). These assemblages are particularly morphologically and taxonomically diverse with three species of genus Roveacrinus and one of genus Orthogonocrinus. The presence of Saccocomidae (Applinocrinus) is especially unusual in such stratigraphic levels. The relative abundance and diversity of Roveacrinidae evidence a peak when approaching the C/T B. Such an event is recurring in the latest Cenomanian in various Tethyan and Atlantic areas. These fluctuations are consistent with a high surface-water productivity just before the C/T B.

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READ IT HERE:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0753396917300241

Lurdes Fonseca

Assistant Professor and Researcher at University of Lisbon
Sociologist (PhD), Paleontologist (Researcher in Micropaleontology), Majors in Sociology and Biology, Minor in Geology. Main interests in Paleontology: Microfossils, Molecular fossils, Paleobiology and Paleoecology. (read more about me)