On the News | This May Be the Oldest Known Sign of Life on Earth @ National Geographic


On the News @ National Geographic


Title:

This May Be the Oldest Known Sign of Life on Earth


Excerpt

“Stalks of iron-rich minerals, each a fraction the size of an eyelash, may be evidence of the earliest life-forms to

Seen under a microscope, these iron-rich tubes may be the oldest known fossils on the planet.
By Matthew Dodd (on source)

inhabit the newborn planet Earth. The tiny hematite tubes are as much as 4.28 billion years old, according to the scientists announcing the find, and they are stunningly similar to structures produced by microbes living around undersea hydrothermal vents.

Discovered in slices of rock recovered from northern Quebec, the microscopic metallic detritus—plus chemical signatures associated with ancient metabolisms—could push back the date at which life arose on Earth. If verified, these fossils would surpass 3.7-billion-year-old microbial mats found in Greenland as the oldest known traces of life.

The microfossils also lend support to the idea that the warm, watery, mineral-rich neighborhoods around submerged vents are prime places for life to emerge, whether on this planet, on the seafloors of icy moons, or elsewhere in the universe. (…)” READ MORE


Read it here:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/03/oldest-life-earth-iron-fossils-canada-vents-science/

Lurdes Fonseca

Assistant Professor and Researcher at University of Lisbon
Sociologist (PhD), Paleontologist (Researcher in Micropaleontology), Majors in Sociology and Biology, Minor in Geology. Main interests in Paleontology: Microfossils, Molecular fossils, Paleobiology and Paleoecology. (read more about me)