The “can opener sea monster” | New Species Reported This Week


Called a “can opener sea monster” by the more imaginative reporters, Cambrian Tokummia katalepsis gen. et sp. nov., a large bivalved arthropod reported this Thursday in Nature from the Canadian Burgess Shale (see video), made headlines all over the world and clearly stands out amongst new species described. Invertebrate new species, especially beetles, are slightly dominant this week, although new fishes, arthropods, medium-size mammals, and mosses, are also reported. Ages are diverse, but Mesozoic species (Cretaceous and Triassic) predominate.

The new species reported this week come from Africa (Kenya), America (Canada) Europe (Germany and Russia), and Asia (China, Kyrgyzstan and Myanmar).


Full account of fossil species reported this week:

  1. Hapalodectes lopatini sp. nov., a new otter-like mesonychids (Mammalia) from the middle Paleocene of China, was reported in Palaeontology (24th April 2017). Click for the web page of this article.

  2. Meantoinea alophosioides gen. et sp. nov., a new polytrichaceous moss from the Early Cretaceous of Vancouver Island, was reported in The American Journal of Botany (24th April 2017). Click for the web page of this article.

  3. Glaesoconis popovi sp. nov. (Makarkin & Perkovsky, 2017)

    Glaesoconis popovi sp. nov., a new species of Glaesoconis (Neuroptera: Coniopterygidae) from Upper Cretaceous (Santonian) Taimyr amber of northern Siberia, was reported in Cretaceous Research (25th April 2017). Click for the web page of this article.

  4. Tokummia katalepsis gen. et sp. nov., a large bivalved arthropod from the Cambrian Marble Canyon fossil deposit (Burgess Shale, British Columbia), was reported in Nature (26th April 2017). Click for the web page of this article.

  5. Cretobythus excavatus gen. et sp. nov., a new species of rove beetles was described based on a well-preserved individual embedded in mid-Cretaceous (Cenomanian) amber from Myanmar, was described in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology (27th April 2017). Click for the web page of this article.

  6. Peltosynidae fam. nov.,  Peltosynidae varyvrosa sp. nov., Gnathopeltos dixis gen. et sp. nov. and Ofthalmopeltos synkritos gen. et sp. nov., new family, genera and species of Middle–Late Triassic beetles of Kyrgyzstan, were reported in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology (27th April 2017). Click for the web page of this article.

  7. Hydropterangium roesleri nov. sp., a new pollen-bearing reproductive organ from the uppermost Triassic (Rhaetian) Germany, was described in Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie – Abhandlungen (28th April 2017). Click for the web page of this article.

  8. Libysiren sickenbergi, gen. et sp. nov., a new sirenian (Mammalia, Protosirenidae) from the middle Eocene of Libya, was reported in Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology (28th April 2017). Click for the web page of this article.
  9. Tugenchromis pickfordi, gen. et sp. nov., a new fish from the Upper Miocene (9–10 Ma) of central Kenya, was reported in Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology (28th April 2017). Click for the web page of this article.

  10. Ankitokazocaris chaohuensis sp. nov., a new arthropod (Thylacocephala) from the Upper Spathian (Early Triassic) of China, was reported in PalZ (29th April 2017). Click for the web page of this article.

Image Credit: click here

Lurdes Fonseca

Assistant Professor and Researcher at University of Lisbon
Sociologist (PhD), Paleontologist (Researcher in Micropaleontology), Majors in Sociology and Biology, Minor in Geology. Main interests in Paleontology: Microfossils, Molecular fossils, Paleobiology and Paleoecology. (read more about me)